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Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |31 May 2015|, 17:26
by bellybuster
oro wrote:Think you would need some pretty sensitive taste buds to pick up 3/4 cup or less fermented corn sugar in 5 gallons of beer, I sure cant tell

some one called me on that a few years back and we did blind taste test on 3 beers. Said one was force carb'd. I called all 3 as sugar primed.... I was right, as well as a few others in our group. If I remember right there were at least 4 out of 6, maybe 7 guys that called sugar primed.
maybe I am sensitive to it, maybe not. I can for sure tell you that the 3 greatest beer improvers for me over the years were.
1) temp control on mash
2) temp control on ferment
3) force carbing with CO2

Probably even above those 3 was forgetting about style guidelines, I brew what I want and/or have on hand.

Sorry, rambled off topic. OP asked for opinions, I gave mine and stand by it. Force carbing is a marked improvement on my beers, your mileage of course may vary

Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |31 May 2015|, 17:29
by bellybuster
onmyword wrote:
bellybuster wrote:regardless, bottling or kegging. Most beers do well with more time
I've noticed mine hit their stride at around 7 weeks. how about yourself?

I do: 3wks primary, 3wks bottle condition + around a week in the fridge.

I find my beers are at prime right before the keg goes PPFFFFFFFFFFFTSH. seriously though, If I can, I allow beers to mellow for at least 6 weeks (unless formulated to drink young). Keeping ahead of that can be a challenge. Especially right now when I am without a brewery. Soon to be rectified

Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |31 May 2015|, 21:10
by Wingeezer
Whenever I have bottle primed beer, it seemed to wind up with a peculiar taste I did not care for. That was the main reason i moved to kegging - I don't get that taste at all.

I assume it must have something to do with the residual yeast in the bottle, even though I always tried to pour very gently. The only time I bottle now is:

- off the keg with a Blichmann beer gun if I want to take some homebrew on an RV trip

- from the carboy if I have a little too much for a keg. In that case I only have a one liter bottle or two, and I put carbonation caps on the bottles.

Maybe my problem was that I was not leaving the bottle primed beer to settle to long enough before sampling.

Someone brought me a bottle conditioned beer just this week, and if was perfect. I didn't detect the unpleasant taste I used to get at all.

When kegging, I chuck the first pint, the next couple are often slighty cloudy and then good and clear.

I use irish moss in the boil, then crash cool the fermented beer in the carboy (I don't use a secondary) and add gelatin then and leave for a few days before racking to a keg.


Brian

Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |31 May 2015|, 23:04
by onmyword
Wingeezer wrote:Maybe my problem was that I was not leaving the bottle primed beer to settle to long enough before sampling.
How long did you bottle condition?

I find that it really needs 3 weeks at room temp then at least 2 days in the fridge

Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |31 May 2015|, 23:09
by onmyword
bellybuster wrote:the 3 greatest beer improvers for me over the years were.
1) temp control on mash
2) temp control on ferment
3) force carbing with CO2

Probably even above those 3 was forgetting about style guidelines, I brew what I want and/or have on hand.

Interesting! How did you pin point mash temperature control as a factor? I find that on a homebrew scale conversion happens within 30 mins even though we mash for 60.

Agree about the style guidelines. I see them as contest rules but taste & preference wins in my book!

Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |01 Jun 2015|, 00:55
by Doc_Drive
I completely agree with bellybuster!

To your question... Combination rests have their place... I find them a) boring, and b) they produce one-dimensional beers (no offense to the brewers here that use that all the time - just my subjective opinion).

I only do step mashing... With that you can actually control how fermentable your beer is (dryer vs. sweeter), whether you want to control the clove/banana aroma/taste ratio in wheat beers, even control how stable the foam is...

Some of my more elaborate beers have 6 different temperature steps during mashing.......

Re: Bottle conditioned vs Kegged re:Quality

Posted: |01 Jun 2015|, 04:28
by bellybuster
onmyword wrote:
Interesting! How did you pin point mash temperature control as a factor? I find that on a homebrew scale conversion happens within 30 mins even though we mash for 60.

Agree about the style guidelines. I see them as contest rules but taste & preference wins in my book!
Once I got control of temp on my mash I also started recirculating the wort. The combination of the two gave me many improvements. Clearer wort, predictable outcome and the ability to do steps.
Clearer wort will obviously change the outcome as those solids are no longer entering the fermenter.
A firm grasp on temps, even within a couple degrees allows you to fine tune ferment ability and ultimately flavour and mouthfeel of your beers.
Not saying everyone should do it, I evolved over several decades. Not because I wasn't happy with my beers but because I just can't leave anything alone.
I just sold my brewery I have been working on for over 20 years. It was almost finished and I decided it was time to try something new so on to BIAB. Pics of my new system coming to a theatre near you soon.