Breadiest Beer Possible

Share your favourite homebrew recipes with other Canadian Home Brewers.
Post Reply
BottomsUp
Posts: 49
Joined: |04 Sep 2015|, 10:33
Favourite Beer: Pilsner
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Breadiest Beer Possible

Post by BottomsUp »

I know that a lot of brewers frown, when a beer is described as "too yeasty" or "two bready". Yet what is beer but the basics of bread - yeast, water and grain.

I had a Westvleteren a year ago directly from the monastery (rated as one of the top beers of the World), and I noticed a peculiar, very bready, cinnamony, raisiny, vanilla taste amongst its other characteristics - sometimes, but rarely noticed by others. I had another Westvleteren several months later (exported to North America), and peculiarly, did not notice these flavours again. Perhaps each of their batches come out a little different, or there may be differences in the resident beers and beers (rarely) shipped abroad.

The original bready, cinnamony, raisony, vanilla taste reminded me strongly of a bread pudding my late Grandmother used to make that I really enjoyed.

So, I was wondering why I wouldn't be able to make a beer that championed these memorable flavours.

Does anyone have any suggestions for any grains and specialty grains that may have a really "bready" and/or cinnamon/vanilla/raisin taste to them (not "toasty")?

Also are there any beer yeasts that are close to the common yeasts used to make bread?

Are there any other suggestions as to how I may be able to create a beer with these flavours?

Thank you.

Goulaigan
Posts: 456
Joined: |14 Jan 2014|, 23:05
Favourite Beer: Mine
Location: Goulais River, ON

Re: Breadiest Beer Possible

Post by Goulaigan »

I would think most of those flavours probably come from the yeast they use, but the grain may play a small role. Maybe try some biscuit malt and some trappist yeast...

BottomsUp
Posts: 49
Joined: |04 Sep 2015|, 10:33
Favourite Beer: Pilsner
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Breadiest Beer Possible

Post by BottomsUp »

Thanks - the biscuit malt may have a little roast flavour to it, lending itself more to toasted bread, but should also have some breadiness to it as well. I agree that the yeast may play a major factor, and have noticed that the Belgian beers do end up with a bready taste.

Post Reply