Dry Yeast

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Canuck
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Dry Yeast

Post #1 by Canuck » 4 years ago

I've been reading a lot of Chris White & Jamil Zainasheff's book on yeast lately. When I was reading it last night I came across an interesting thing on dry yeast. Here is a quote from the book.

While most commercial brewers rehydrate their dry yeast before pitching, many homebrewers just sprinkle the dry yeast on top of their wort. Perhaps they read it in a book, or their local expert told them rehydration was not necessary. Technically the beer will ferment if you pitch enough nonrehydrated yeast, but you are not giving the yeast an opportunity to make the best beer possible. Skipping rehydration kills about half the cells pitched. Besides having only half as much yeast as is needed, the dead cells immediately begin to break down and affect the beer flavour.


I always rehydrate my dry yeast, but I had no idea that if you pitched it directly into the wort without rehydration it kills half of the cells. I figured that I would pass this along here in case others weren't aware of this.

Also, making a starter with dry yeast is something that recently came up here in one of the threads. Here's another small snippet from the book regarding that.

Another case where you normally do not want to make a starter is with dry yeast. Dry yeast is inexpensive, and it is usually cheaper, easier, and safer to buy more dry yeast than to make a large starter. Many experts suggest that placing dry yeast in a starter just depletes the cell reserves that the yeast manufacturer tries to build into their product. For dry yeast, do a proper rehydration in tap water; do not make a starter.


Anyways, just wanted to past along to info from this book. Btw, it's a fantastic book on yeast and I'd highly recommend it. It provides very in depth information but in an easy to understand way where you don't need to be a scientist to understand it.

http://www.amazon.ca/Yeast-Practical-Gu ... 233&sr=8-1
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #2 by jeffsmith » 4 years ago

Very interesting. I normally rehydrate my dry yeast, but the last time I used dry, I was in a bit of a hurry and didn't. Not surprisingly I wasn't completely happy with the end result. There were some phenol tastes that showed up in the beer that really shouldn't have (4.5% wheat beer), but they eventually cleared out. I've got one more pack of the same dry yeast (Mauribrew Weiss), so the next time I'm definitely going to rehydrate and see if I get a different result.
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #3 by Jack » 4 years ago

After hearing lots of experienced guys recommend either way, it's nice to read something decisive from a respected expert. There are so many things to consider besides the basics that i personally haven't addressed.
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #4 by Swivel » 4 years ago

Great info, Shane, thanks for that.
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #5 by Canuck » 4 years ago

Canuck wrote:I've been reading a lot of Chris White & Jamil Zainasheff's book on yeast lately. When I was reading it last night I came across an interesting thing on dry yeast. Here is a quote from the book.

While most commercial brewers rehydrate their dry yeast before pitching, many homebrewers just sprinkle the dry yeast on top of their wort. Perhaps they read it in a book, or their local expert told them rehydration was not necessary. Technically the beer will ferment if you pitch enough nonrehydrated yeast, but you are not giving the yeast an opportunity to make the best beer possible. Skipping rehydration kills about half the cells pitched. Besides having only half as much yeast as is needed, the dead cells immediately begin to break down and affect the beer flavour.


I always rehydrate my dry yeast, but I had no idea that if you pitched it directly into the wort without rehydration it kills half of the cells. I figured that I would pass this along here in case others weren't aware of this.

Also, making a starter with dry yeast is something that recently came up here in one of the threads. Here's another small snippet from the book regarding that.

Another case where you normally do not want to make a starter is with dry yeast. Dry yeast is inexpensive, and it is usually cheaper, easier, and safer to buy more dry yeast than to make a large starter. Many experts suggest that placing dry yeast in a starter just depletes the cell reserves that the yeast manufacturer tries to build into their product. For dry yeast, do a proper rehydration in tap water; do not make a starter.


Anyways, just wanted to past along to info from this book. Btw, it's a fantastic book on yeast and I'd highly recommend it. It provides very in depth information but in an easy to understand way where you don't need to be a scientist to understand it.

http://www.amazon.ca/Yeast-Practical-Gu ... 233&sr=8-1



Holy horrible grammar/spelling! I guess I should probably refrain from posting in the morning before having my first coffee. LOL :P

Jeff, I'd be interested to hear how the taste profile differs the next time you brew that recipe with the Mauribrew Weiss yeast and rehydrate.
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #6 by birvine » 4 years ago

I believe it is the shock of the sugars in the wort that kill some of the yeast.

It looks like an interesting read. I recall reading somewhere (??) about yeast behaviour written by a microbiologist. I'll do some digging around and report back.

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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #7 by Reignman » 4 years ago

I usually rehydrate my dry yeast, but sometimes I don't. I really haven't noticed any difference in the taste, but my taste buds maybe aren't as sharp as they should be. Basic Brewing Radio did a show on this very same subject and check out the archives if you get a chance.

www.basicbrewing.com

I have the yeast book also, but Jamil IMO seems to frown on any dry yeast. I personally think that he goes to sleep at night with White Labs pillow cases and sheets.
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #8 by birvine » 4 years ago

Reignman wrote:I usually rehydrate my dry yeast, but sometimes I don't. I really haven't noticed any difference in the taste, but my taste buds maybe aren't as sharp as they should be. Basic Brewing Radio did a show on this very same subject and check out the archives if you get a chance.

www.basicbrewing.com

I have the yeast book also, but Jamil IMO seems to frown on any dry yeast. I personally think that he goes to sleep at night with White Labs pillow cases and sheets.


I was wondering about his knowledge, too. That is, theoretically true, but realistically not an issue.

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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #9 by wasp » 4 years ago

I concur with the 2 quotes from the original post.

I have noticed that rehydrated yeast seems to get off to a quicker start than pitching directly into the wort. Direct pitching seems to work fine in upper 60's low to medium abv fermentations, but I wouldn't recommend it for cool/cold fermentations or for higher %abv .

A few years ago I thought I'd get the little yeasties off to a flying start for a "big beer" by making up a 2L starter from a single sachet of dried yeast in an Erlenmeyer on my stir-plate. Was that ever the WRONG idea. Luckily there was no problem pitching one rehydrated packet of yeast after 3 days of no activity. The expensive grain bill was saved - even received rave reviews. Phew!

The flasks and stir-plate are now reserved for liquid yeasts - which I seem to be using less-frequently in recent years as I believe that dried yeasts have improved significantly. Of course, that could be due to the advancing age of my sensory systems. :$
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Re: Dry Yeast

Post #10 by Reignman » 4 years ago

I buy bricks of dry yeast and vacuum seal them. I use dry yeast for most of my light summer ales, pale ales etc. Since liquid yeast is getting easier to buy here and fresher, I have been buying some that I have never used before. The selection is endless now a days. However, I am brewing this week and do plan on rehydrating my dry yeast. If what Jamil says, ( you kill 60% of the cells in direct pitching ) then that means I am under pitching, so rehydrating it is.

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